Hawk's Aerie

Learn from the Past, Live in the Present, Adapt to the Future - Be the Change You Want to See in the World - Be YOU, and only You, and Fuck Everything Else

19,521 notes

raijumykaiju:

I want to talk about David Alleyne for a minute. I want to talk about bisexuality. I want to talk about how I lived 21 fucking years on this planet, 21 years consuming massive amounts of media, movies, tv shows, comics, and I had never until this moment seen a character say “I’m bisexual. I want to talk about being 13 years old and knowing that gay people existed but thinking I was sick and broken because I couldn’t choose between being gay or straight.

"It was like realizing something that was always true and I just couldn’t see it until now."

I want to talk about how ashamed I feel for mocking my friend’s bisexuality in high school and helping to force them back into the closet, all the while thinking ‘I fixed myself so why can’t you?’, never knowing how much I was hurting myself and others.

I want to talk about the bone deep fear I feel around people I don’t know if I can trust. I want to talk about how it is absolutely no different from the fears gay men and lesbian women have. It’s the same racing thoughts, the same paranoid worries, is this person safe? Can I trust them? Can they tell? Is there something about me that will tip them off? Did I let something slip that I shouldn’t have?

I want to talk about how hard I cried after reading this issue of Young Avengers. Because I’d never seen anyone, fictional or real, be allowed to identify themselves as bisexual without question or ridicule from their peers.

No doubt, I’ve seen characters that are attracted to multiple different genders, but they are never ever allowed the agency to tell the world who they are on their own terms. It’s always other people who get to decide what they are. They’re too gay for one partner, or too straight for another, but they are never proudly, defiantly, lovingly allowed to be bisexual. David is a revolutionary character, for so many reasons, and I can’t speak to what he means as a bisexual man of color, but I want to talk about how David Alleyne changed my life.

YES!

(Source: allyourfavesarebi, via whoistorule)

122,361 notes

rifa:

prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.
High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.
But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

FASHION HISTORY IS HUMAN HISTORY OK

rifa:

prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.

High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.

But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

FASHION HISTORY IS HUMAN HISTORY OK

(via whoistorule)

3,302 notes

africaisdonesuffering:

#BringBackOurGirls
when the enemy comesbathe your daughters in spiceshide razor blades between their thighslay bullets underneath their tonguesset their wombs on fire
when the enemy comesrub the feces of your cattlein the mouths of your daughterslet them chant spells into their nostrilsleaving their attackers repulsed
when the enemy comesand the men are ready to make sacrifices out of the bodies of our girlsteach them to hide their necks underwaterto tie their breasts flatto shave their heads
prepare your daughtersfor when the enemy comes
-Bilphena Yahwon, “when the enemy comes”
Two weeks ago, more than 230 young girls between the ages of 16 and 18 years were abducted at gunpoint in Chibok, Nigeria after militants (Boko Haram) overpowered a military guard assigned to their boarding school.  The kidnapping occurred the same day a massive explosion, which Boko Haram’s leader Abubakar Shekau has since taken responsibility for, killed 75 people in the capital of Abuja. The young ladies had just finished their final school exams.
In the wake of this tragedy, parents have grown frustrated by what they perceive as a feckless governmental response. Desperate to locate their children, relatives have launched their own search riding motorcycles deep into the Sambisa forest where the girls were being held.
“All we want from the government is to help us bring our children back” –Pogo Yaga
“My wife keeps asking me, why isn’t the government deploying every means to find our children.” –Dawah
Despite the slow response from media, news of the missing girls has ignited a social media campaign underneath the hashtag #BringBackOurGirls. People all around the world are demanding the safe return of all the young ladies violently stolen from their families. They are demanding the Nigerian government to work urgently and diligently in order to ensure that our daughters are returned intact.
Women all over Nigeria have started a one million women march in Abuja to press for the release of the girls. The first lady, Hajia Nana, called on the wives of service chiefs to put pressure on their husbands, “I want to seek this opportunity to appeal to women of security chiefs at the national and state level to run and mount pressures on your spouse’s to intensify effort to rescue our dear children however I feel it is necessary to call on all women in Borno to come up with their resolutions and harmonize them”
So, what can you do to help? In truth, there is little that we can do, but “little” is more than nothing. Start by sharing this story to those in your space. Though some media outlets have covered this situation, it hasn’t been well publicized. When you share this story on social media, use the hashtags #BringBackOurDaughters and #BringBackOurGirls. You can also sign online petitions. One has been started at change.org to urge Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, the UN’s Under-Secretary-General and Executive Director of UN, to have UN Women and UNICEF make this abduction a priority and to pressure the Nigerian government to find our girls. For those abroad, you can contact the UN office of your home country and urge them to act. For those in the United States, you can contact your senators and representatives asking them to address this situation.
-Bilphena Yahwon

africaisdonesuffering:

#BringBackOurGirls

when the enemy comes
bathe your daughters in spices
hide razor blades between their thighs
lay bullets underneath their tongues
set their wombs on fire

when the enemy comes
rub the feces of your cattle
in the mouths of your daughters
let them chant spells into their nostrils
leaving their attackers repulsed

when the enemy comes
and the men are ready to make sacrifices out of the bodies of our girls
teach them to hide their necks underwater
to tie their breasts flat
to shave their heads

prepare your daughters
for when the enemy comes

-Bilphena Yahwon, “when the enemy comes”

Two weeks ago, more than 230 young girls between the ages of 16 and 18 years were abducted at gunpoint in Chibok, Nigeria after militants (Boko Haram) overpowered a military guard assigned to their boarding school.  The kidnapping occurred the same day a massive explosion, which Boko Haram’s leader Abubakar Shekau has since taken responsibility for, killed 75 people in the capital of Abuja. The young ladies had just finished their final school exams.

In the wake of this tragedy, parents have grown frustrated by what they perceive as a feckless governmental response. Desperate to locate their children, relatives have launched their own search riding motorcycles deep into the Sambisa forest where the girls were being held.

“All we want from the government is to help us bring our children back” –Pogo Yaga

“My wife keeps asking me, why isn’t the government deploying every means to find our children.” –Dawah

Despite the slow response from media, news of the missing girls has ignited a social media campaign underneath the hashtag #BringBackOurGirls. People all around the world are demanding the safe return of all the young ladies violently stolen from their families. They are demanding the Nigerian government to work urgently and diligently in order to ensure that our daughters are returned intact.

Women all over Nigeria have started a one million women march in Abuja to press for the release of the girls. The first lady, Hajia Nana, called on the wives of service chiefs to put pressure on their husbands, “I want to seek this opportunity to appeal to women of security chiefs at the national and state level to run and mount pressures on your spouse’s to intensify effort to rescue our dear children however I feel it is necessary to call on all women in Borno to come up with their resolutions and harmonize them”

So, what can you do to help? In truth, there is little that we can do, but “little” is more than nothing. Start by sharing this story to those in your space. Though some media outlets have covered this situation, it hasn’t been well publicized. When you share this story on social media, use the hashtags #BringBackOurDaughters and #BringBackOurGirls. You can also sign online petitions. One has been started at change.org to urge Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, the UN’s Under-Secretary-General and Executive Director of UN, to have UN Women and UNICEF make this abduction a priority and to pressure the Nigerian government to find our girls. For those abroad, you can contact the UN office of your home country and urge them to act. For those in the United States, you can contact your senators and representatives asking them to address this situation.

-Bilphena Yahwon

(via queeringfeministreality)

Filed under bringbackourgirls

245,673 notes

truckyousasha:

thekaraokeninja:

fandomsandfeminism:

generalmaluga:

albinwonderland:

fandomsandfeminism:

betterthanabortion:

"My body, my choice" only makes sense when someone else’s life isn’t at stake.

Fun fact: If my younger sister was in a car accident and desperately needed a blood transfusion to live, and I was the only person on Earth who could donate blood to save her, and even though donating blood is a relatively easy, safe, and quick procedure no one can force me to give blood. Yes, even to save the life of a fully grown person, it would be ILLEGAL to FORCE me to donate blood if I didn’t want to.
See, we have this concept called “bodily autonomy.” It’s this….cultural notion that a person’s control over their own body is above all important and must not be infringed upon. 
Like, we can’t even take LIFE SAVING organs from CORPSES unless the person whose corpse it is gave consent before their death. Even corpses get bodily autonomy. 
To tell people that they MUST sacrifice their bodily autonomy for 9 months against their will in an incredibly expensive, invasive, difficult process to save what YOU view as another human life (a debatable claim in the early stages of pregnancy when the VAST majority of abortions are performed) is desperately unethical. You can’t even ask people to sacrifice bodily autonomy to give up organs they aren’t using anymore after they have died. 
You’re asking people who can become pregnant to accept less bodily autonomy than we grant to dead bodies. 

reblogging for commentary 

But, assuming the mother wasn’t raped, the choice to HAVE a baby and risk sacrificing their “bodily autonomy” is a choice that the mother made. YOu don’t have to have sex with someone. Cases of rape aside, it isn’t ethical to say abortion is justified. The unborn baby has rights, too. 

First point: Bodily autonomy can be preserved, even if another life is dependent on it. See again the example about the blood donation. 
And here’s another point: When you say that “rape is the exception” you betray something FUNDAMENTALLY BROKEN about your own argument.
Because a fetus produced from sexual assault is biologically NO DIFFERENT than a fetus produced from consensual sex. No difference at all.
If one is alive, so is the other. If one is a person, so is the other. If one has a soul, then so does the other. If one is a little blessing that happened for a reason and must be protected, then so is the other. 
When you say that “Rape is the exception” what you betray is this: It isn’t about a life. This isn’t about the little soul sitting inside some person’s womb, because if it was you wouldn’t care about HOW it got there, only that it is a little life that needs protecting.
When you say “rape is the exception” what you say is this: You are treating pregnancy as a punishment. You are PUNISHING people who have had CONSENSUAL SEX but don’t want to go through a pregnancy. People who DARED to have consensual sex without the goal of procreation in mind, and this is their “consequence.” 
And that is gross. 

^ THIS. This is this this THIS THIS THIS. THIS!!!!!

This is probably the strongest and well worded/supported argument for abortion that I have ever read.


Reblog for commentary!

truckyousasha:

thekaraokeninja:

fandomsandfeminism:

generalmaluga:

albinwonderland:

fandomsandfeminism:

betterthanabortion:

"My body, my choice" only makes sense when someone else’s life isn’t at stake.

Fun fact: If my younger sister was in a car accident and desperately needed a blood transfusion to live, and I was the only person on Earth who could donate blood to save her, and even though donating blood is a relatively easy, safe, and quick procedure no one can force me to give blood. Yes, even to save the life of a fully grown person, it would be ILLEGAL to FORCE me to donate blood if I didn’t want to.

See, we have this concept called “bodily autonomy.” It’s this….cultural notion that a person’s control over their own body is above all important and must not be infringed upon. 

Like, we can’t even take LIFE SAVING organs from CORPSES unless the person whose corpse it is gave consent before their death. Even corpses get bodily autonomy. 

To tell people that they MUST sacrifice their bodily autonomy for 9 months against their will in an incredibly expensive, invasive, difficult process to save what YOU view as another human life (a debatable claim in the early stages of pregnancy when the VAST majority of abortions are performed) is desperately unethical. You can’t even ask people to sacrifice bodily autonomy to give up organs they aren’t using anymore after they have died. 

You’re asking people who can become pregnant to accept less bodily autonomy than we grant to dead bodies. 

reblogging for commentary 

But, assuming the mother wasn’t raped, the choice to HAVE a baby and risk sacrificing their “bodily autonomy” is a choice that the mother made. YOu don’t have to have sex with someone. Cases of rape aside, it isn’t ethical to say abortion is justified. The unborn baby has rights, too. 

First point: Bodily autonomy can be preserved, even if another life is dependent on it. See again the example about the blood donation. 

And here’s another point: When you say that “rape is the exception” you betray something FUNDAMENTALLY BROKEN about your own argument.

Because a fetus produced from sexual assault is biologically NO DIFFERENT than a fetus produced from consensual sex. No difference at all.

If one is alive, so is the other. If one is a person, so is the other. If one has a soul, then so does the other. If one is a little blessing that happened for a reason and must be protected, then so is the other. 

When you say that “Rape is the exception” what you betray is this: It isn’t about a life. This isn’t about the little soul sitting inside some person’s womb, because if it was you wouldn’t care about HOW it got there, only that it is a little life that needs protecting.

When you say “rape is the exception” what you say is this: You are treating pregnancy as a punishment. You are PUNISHING people who have had CONSENSUAL SEX but don’t want to go through a pregnancy. People who DARED to have consensual sex without the goal of procreation in mind, and this is their “consequence.” 

And that is gross. 

^ THIS. This is this this THIS THIS THIS. THIS!!!!!

This is probably the strongest and well worded/supported argument for abortion that I have ever read.

Reblog for commentary!

(via queeringfeministreality)

11 notes

imnotaustinpowers:

"Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They’re not find of rules. And they have no respect for the status quo. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them. About the only thing you can do is ignore them. Because they change things. They invent. They imagine. They heal. They explore. They create. They inspire. They push the human race forward. Maybe they have to be crazy. How else can you stare at an empty canvas and see a work of art? Or sit in silence and hear a song that’s never been written? Or gaze at a red planet and see a laboratory on wheels? We make tools for these kinds of people. While some see then as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do."
*Taken with iPhone 5C. Edited in VSCOcam*
#stevejobs #apple #quote #vscocam #vsco #thecrazyones #thinkdifferent #inspiration #inspire #genuis #crazy #misfits #rebels

imnotaustinpowers:

"Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They’re not find of rules. And they have no respect for the status quo. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them. About the only thing you can do is ignore them. Because they change things. They invent. They imagine. They heal. They explore. They create. They inspire. They push the human race forward. Maybe they have to be crazy. How else can you stare at an empty canvas and see a work of art? Or sit in silence and hear a song that’s never been written? Or gaze at a red planet and see a laboratory on wheels? We make tools for these kinds of people. While some see then as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do."

*Taken with iPhone 5C. Edited in VSCOcam*

#stevejobs #apple #quote #vscocam #vsco #thecrazyones #thinkdifferent #inspiration #inspire #genuis #crazy #misfits #rebels

30,044 notes

The messages you received from your family or your childhood experiences may have caused you to believe that assertiveness is unacceptable or even dangerous. Practice saying the following: I have the right to be treated with respect by others. I have the right to express my feelings and opinions. I have the right to say no without feeling guilty. I have the right to ask for what I want. I have the right to make my own mistakes. I have the right to pursue happiness.

Nice Girl Syndrome, Beverly Engel (via anditslove)

Yessss

(via thefemcritique)

(Source: speakoutbeheard, via fuckyeahsexeducation)

24,840 notes

radicalashell:

themostdappergentleman:

the-avengers-carnival:

tuulikki:

jimsgayunderwear:

tuulikki:

This is definitely the best bar in existence.

Where is this and why am I not drunk there.

River Song sounds delicious.

Here. And one day I will convince everyone on my dash to come out and drinks will be on me.

I NEED TO GO THERE

Looks like I found another stop on our Super Amazing Summer Roadtrip Adventure.

oh my god! The Ryuk The Shinigami! So fucking clever.

(via crepuscularmusings)

449,940 notes

text-pistol:

Have you ever just looked at someone and thought, “Holy jesus, I really love you?” They’re just talking or humming or watching a movie or reading a book or laughing or something, and there’s something about them in that moment—their body is alive, there’s a light in their eyes, something—that makes you think, “I just really love you.” It’s a weird sensation to think this, but it’s pretty awesome that we can feel this way about another being.

(via dessnerds)

186,175 notes

dirkbot:

things they don’t show you in porn:

  • elbowing each other in the face
  • leg cramps
  • queefing
  • accidentally pulling each other’s hair
  • ass pubes

things they also don’t show in porn:

  • sleepy morning sex
  • mutual giggle fits over awkward situations
  • sex fading into cuddles fading into sex and back into cuddles
  • your lover’s o face

so don’t ever compare yourself to porn thank you

(via fuckyeahsexeducation)

2,628 notes

janetmock:

Something I wrote in solidarity with NBJC - which launched the #BlackTransProud campaign for Trans Awareness Week:
I’m a woman. I’m black. I’m trans. And I’m alive. That’s a radical idea if youreally think about it because trans women of color - specifically black andbrown bodies - are active agents in our own survival despite unbearablestatistics, lack of resources, dehumanizing media stories and exiling from manyspaces. 
And this notion of survival and resistance isn’t new. 
We’ve always been survivors (I bow to Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera as I write this). For me, personally and politically, there’s no separating my womanness, my blackness, my transness from my me-ness. 
I am a trans woman of color who is writing, speaking, loving, fighting, smiling, living and who honestly has no choice but to be exactly who I am and use the blessings I have been given to shed light on the struggles and triumphs of my community. 
To be of service and to be fully me makes me proud.

janetmock:

Something I wrote in solidarity with NBJC - which launched the #BlackTransProud campaign for Trans Awareness Week:

I’m a woman. I’m black. I’m trans. And I’m alive. That’s a radical idea if you
really think about it because trans women of color - specifically black and
brown bodies - are active agents in our own survival despite unbearable
statistics, lack of resources, dehumanizing media stories and exiling from many
spaces.

And this notion of survival and resistance isn’t new.

We’ve always been survivors (I bow to Marsha P. Johnson and Sylvia Rivera as I write this). For me, personally and politically, there’s no separating my womanness, my blackness, my transness from my me-ness.

I am a trans woman of color who is writing, speaking, loving, fighting, smiling, living and who honestly has no choice but to be exactly who I am and use the blessings I have been given to shed light on the struggles and triumphs of my community.

To be of service and to be fully me makes me proud.

(via projectqueer)